• 19 Oct 2016 10:53 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Are You Ready for DOL Overtime Rules?

    The Department of Labor’s or DOL new overtime rules are set to go into effect on December 1st. To help you sort out the requirements and navigate your own situation, the AIA has published a number of overviews.

    DOL Overtime Rules

    See the recent AIA articles below along with a DOL fact sheet:

    In addition, the AIA just co-sponsored a webinar hosted by K&L Gates about the overtime rules and how to deal with them.  You may access the webinar by clicking here: http://cc.callinfo.com/play?id=1p1fy

    Remember, planning is key and December 1st will roll around quickly. You need to determine how exactly the overtime rule will impact your firm, based on its size, location, and other factors. In addition, you will need to consider how other businesses with which you subcontract may be impacted by new labor costs so that any changes may be incorporated into your business projections.

    For questions on the DOL Overtime Rules, please contact Alex Ford, Manager, Federal Relations at the AIA, at 202-626-7442.

  • 19 Oct 2016 10:50 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Ten Things To Know About P3s

    In her new role as Director of Victor O. Schinnerer & Company’s Risk Management Services, Yvonne Castillo will be expanding the company’s resources in terms of project delivery for public works. She’s identified the 10 things on which architects should focus when trying to enter the public-private partnership or P3 project delivery market.

    Public Private Partnerships

    With governments across the nation struggling to make ends meet, i.e., increased infrastructure demand with decreased funding, many are turning to new ways to fund the upfront costs associated with the design and construction of horizontal and vertical infrastructure. One of those new ways involves private financing of public infrastructure.

    (1) Nomenclature

    When you hear “P3” or “PPP” or “public-private partnerships,” substitute “design-build-finance-operate-maintain project delivery.” It’s been used for decades in other parts of the world to deliver public infrastructure (horizontal and vertical) and now governmental entities (federal, state, and local) in the United States have developed a strong interest in institutionalizing this as a new project delivery method to deliver public infrastructure.

    (2) New Laws

    To gain traction in the U.S. and minimize the political risks for investors, comprehensive enabling legislation has either passed or is being considered across the country. As an architect, you have a vested interest in influencing how these laws are written and how your services will be procured. You can view a comprehensive webinar on the legislative landscape. Contact your state professional association to explore ways for you (and your profession) to get involved.

    (3) New Stand-Alone P3 Agencies Are Being Created

    To assist states in identifying, vetting, and developing a pipeline of P3 projects and to support agencies that have an interest in exploring the use of P3, states are following cues from other countries’ experiences by creating stand-alone agencies with P3 expertise who can effectively analyze value for money and a comparison to other project delivery methods.

    (4) Market Drivers

    The market drivers for P3 in the U.S. are (1) severe deferred maintenance and (2) severe budgetary constraints. Depending on the type of infrastructure (i.e. roads, bridges, ports, water treatment facilities, dams, airports, schools, etc.), the last major investments occurred 50 years ago.

    (5) Greenfield/Brownfield Pipeline

    The pipeline of greenfield projects in the U.S. is robust, having more than tripled in 2016 so far, as compared to 2015, with a capital expenditure value of almost $8 billion…and we’re only halfway through the year. Brownfield projects have been a tougher nut to crack in this space, but in the U.S., due to the vast under-investment over the past several decades in existing infrastructure, there should likely be a similarly robust pipeline of projects.

    (6) Recent Projects

    In the last 18 months, 11 deals have closed with a value of $10.4 billion total, with an average per capital expenditure of $945 million. Next Wave: Depending on your state, there are a number of P3 projects being planned in California, Virginia, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Michigan, Iowa, Texas, and Florida – 23 known so far. See InfraDeals, Breaking the Barriers to US Infrastructure Potential (2016).

    (7) Procurement

    The P3 procurement process is lengthy, averaging just over two years per project, and involving multi-million dollar front-end investment by teams in hopes of winning the project. See InfraDeals, Breaking the Barriers to US Infrastructure Potential (2016).

    (8) Funding/Financing

    This isn’t a funding tool; it’s all about financing, and there’s plenty of private capital ready to be tapped to help finance the upfront planning, design, and construction. Institutional investors (such as pension funds) have a keen interest in investing in public infrastructure because of low yields in other markets and the fact that public asset classes perform consistently well and are well-suited for long-term returns. Municipal bonds remain another source of funding and are often instrumental in attracting private investor interests to make the P3 contracts an attractive return on investment.

    (9) Life-Cycle Considerations

    Government capital construction budgets have not historically accounted for operations and maintenance issues. P3, because it is based on long-term financing, allows (and encourages) governments to think about what it costs to own a building or other asset throughout its life-cycle. It’s important to note that P3 involves ownership remaining with the public entity, while M&O responsibilities are transferred over a long-term period.

    (10) Bundling is Gaining Traction

    This project delivery method generally makes sense for investors when the projects are large and complex due to the high-transactional costs, but lately there’s been a trend toward bundling smaller assets (schools, bridges, municipal buildings), which means small and medium-sized design firms may see an uptick in activity.

    Private financing of public infrastructure is a solution, among others, that can help governments not only in moving forward with new construction, but also, and most importantly, in renewing infrastructure and integrating modern design and technology. It’s not a panacea, however; the vast majority of projects aren’t necessarily large enough to be bankable prospects. The key takeaway and benefit is that if certain large-scale projects can access private financing, capital construction budgets will be freed-up to move forward with traditional funding, and that’s a good thing for everyone.

    If you’re reading this and wondering how your firm might start exploring P3 work, the ways are not unlike exploring any other public works—your firm should read industry publications, including P3 publications, (e.g. P3 Bulletin, InfraAmericas), review local planning board and city council meeting minutes to flag P3 planning, review state public agency websites for upcoming solicitations, and prioritize relationship-building with large A/E (E/A) firms who are currently doing this kind of work.

    Victor O. Schinnerer & Company, Inc. and CNA work with the AIA Trust to offer AIA members quality risk management coverage through the AIA Trust Professional Liability Insurance Program and Business Owners Program to address the challenges that architects face today and in the future. Detailed information about both these programs may be found on the AIA Trust website, TheAIATrust.com.

  • 22 Aug 2016 8:53 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Letter From Home: Adding depth to downtown Sarasota

    By Harold Bubil , Herald-Tribune

    / Sunday, August 21, 2016

    Guy Peterson with his Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects' Florida/Caribbean chapter. Staff photo / Harold Bubil; 8-16-2016.

    Guy Peterson with his Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects' Florida/Caribbean chapter. Staff photo / Harold Bubil; 8-16-2016.

    The Herald-Tribune’s well-attended reception for AIA Florida Gold Medal-winning architect Guy Peterson on Aug. 16 touched on a number of subjects, including designing with sea-level rise in mind (a serious issue in Florida, to be saved for another day here), and the evolution of downtown Sarasota.

    The architect panelists – AIA Florida’s 2016 Design Awards winners Jonathan Parks, Jerry Sparkman, Michael Halflants, Greg Hall, Sam Holladay, Carl Abbott and Peterson – noted that with the rapid construction of residential buildings both in downtown and the Rosemary District, another type of retail will be needed – grocery stores to go along with the plethora of restaurants, clothes stores and gift shops.

    “What makes this a great city, and will continue to do so, is a balance between all parts of what makes up our culture,” Hall said. “We have residential being built right now. But what have to come with that are the types of businesses and types of architecture to support that. Remember the 5&10 on Main Street that is no longer there? The 5&10 will come back. The corner grocery store will come back, because now there is going to be a need.”

    While many longtime residents complain about the pace of change in Sarasota, Abbott, who established his practice here 50 years ago, said, “It is hard to judge right now. All of this is happening so rapidly. Most cities evolve over long periods and adapt to the buildings as they are built. That is not happening right now.

    “There have to be more grocery stores beside Whole Foods,” Abbott said. “There have to be more shops, more tailors, because people will be living here. And with all the people filling these buildings, it is going to be hell to drive.”

    Halflants, who is designing 4- and 5-story multi-family buildings in the Rosemary District, said that area’s development will add an extra dimension to Sarasota’s built environment.

    “You are creating a streetscape, an environment created by many buildings together,” Halflants said. “The Rosemary District has some older buildings to go with the new ones, and it is really going to give the city more depth.

    “I have been looking for the downtown for a long time in Sarasota. Having more depth, so it is not just Main Street, where you have other places you can go, is only going to put the pants back on the city.” (That, a reference to urban planner Andres Duany’s one-time assertion that from an urban development standpoint, Sarasota needed to take off its beach shorts and put on some grown-up pants.)

    Follow Harold on Twitter (@htrealestate) and Facebook (Facebook.com/Harold.Bubil).

  • 15 Aug 2016 11:16 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    WFTS Webteam

    4:41 AM, Aug 2, 2016

    4:43 AM, Aug 2, 2016

    Copyright 2016 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

    SARASOTA, Fla. - Tech Insider has released a list of the most beautiful libraries in each U.S. State and they have named The Gulf Gate Library in Sarasota the most beautiful in Florida. 

    The past and current award-winners from each state were judged by the American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association awards. 

    Here's the caption about the Gulf Gate Library:

    Florida: The Gulf Gate Library in Sarasota opened less than a year ago but has already been recognized by the AIA Florida chapter for its flexible meeting spaces and warm, inviting design.

    The Sarasota County Libraries Facebook page said it was an honor to be included on the list.

  • 07 Aug 2016 12:17 PM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Ryan Gamma, AIA Florida's Photographer of the Year

    By Harold Bubil , Herald-Tribune

    / Sunday, August 7, 2016

    Architectural photographer Ryan Gamma of Sarasota is AIA Florida's 2016 Photographer of the Year. He is seen here at the new Siesta Beach pavilion designed by Sweet Sparkman Architects. STAFF PHOTO / DAN WAGNER

    Architectural photographer Ryan Gamma of Sarasota is AIA Florida's 2016 Photographer of the Year. He is seen here at the new Siesta Beach pavilion designed by Sweet Sparkman Architects. STAFF PHOTO / DAN WAGNER

    Ryan Gamma used to spend much of his workday treading water, and, as often as not, in over his head.

    Now he spends it backed up in a corner, trying to keep everything straight.

    Gamma, 36, of Sarasota, is a professional photographer. He started his career as a surf photog, dodging boards while getting breathtaking shots of “the athletes” in the shadows of breaking waves known as tubes. But he gave up the “young man’s game” in favor of shooting houses and other structures for real estate agents and architects.

    Not many tubes — just lots of squares. Besides lighting and composition, he is concerned with making sure the clean lines of modernist architecture are as straight as possible in the frame.

    This house, formerly the Freund House when designed by Guy Peterson on Siesta Key in 2000, and photographed in April 2016 by Ryan Gamma.

    This house, formerly the Freund House when designed by Guy Peterson on Siesta Key in 2000, and photographed in April 2016 by Ryan Gamma.

    One of his favorite shots is to stand in the corner of a room and shoot toward the other corner to capture as much of the space as possible.

    “In real estate, you create lifestyle images that are enticing to the buyer, but at the same time, you are really there to document space,” Gamma said. “They want to see the rooms they are buying. It is not so much about interior design or shooting vignettes of the furnishings.

    “Shooting the corners is a good way to show a potential buyer what they have. With a rectangular space, if you stand in the corners, you can show the space quickly.”

    But when shooting architectural photos for such architects as Guy Peterson and Todd Sweet and Jerry Sparkman, space, light and form take priority.

    “I look for symmetry,” he said.

    The former Hafner Residence, now owned by the Streacker family, in Sarasota's Laurel Park, as photographed by Ryan Gamma.

    The former Hafner Residence, now owned by the Streacker family, in Sarasota's Laurel Park, as photographed by Ryan Gamma.

    Gamma is good at it. On July 23, he received 2016 “Photographer of the Year” honors at the convention of the American Institute of Architects’ Florida/Caribbean chapter in Palm Beach.

    “The way he sees things is different,” said Peterson, the AIA Florida 2016 Gold Medal winner, who nominated Gamma for the photography award. “I have a strategy about hiring photographers. A lot of people would say to them, ‘I want you to take this picture and this picture and that picture.’ I may have one image I might want to have, but I don’t want to prejudice the photographer. I like them to go out and interpret the project with their cameras and their art.

    “He always surprises me by seeing things that even I haven’t seen in my work,” Peterson said of Gamma. “That, I find, to be a real attribute of his. The clarity of his photography and the depth of field are remarkable. I am so glad he has received this award. I am very proud of him.

    “And it is not just his architecture photos. His other work is quite spectacular,” including the surfing photos, which he began shooting after graduating in 2000 from Daytona Beach Community College’s (now Daytona State College) photography program.

    Hand in hand

    Built as the multi-colored Freund House in 2000 and now with new owners, this house was designed by Guy Peterson on Siesta Key and photographed in April 2016 by Ryan Gamma.

    Built as the multi-colored Freund House in 2000 and now with new owners, this house was designed by Guy Peterson on Siesta Key and photographed in April 2016 by Ryan Gamma.

    Photography and architecture go hand in hand. In fact, architects are dependent upon photographers; in most architecture design awards programs, the jury makes its decisions based upon photos.

    Photographs are “the most important part of disseminating one’s work beyond the client,” said University of Florida architecture professor Martin Gold. “It is what makes the work more of a community experience, nationally and internationally.”

    Without architectural photography, the Sarasota School of architecture might be just a footnote. But photographer Ezra Stoller’s large-format, black-and-white photographs of the 1940s and ‘50s designs of Paul Rudolph, and others, are considered classics of the art and brought international fame to the city. They served as the core imagery for John Howey’s 1995 book, “The Sarasota School of Architecture.”

    Gamma feels the legacy.

    “For me, I am quite partial to modern” architecture, he said. “I like the historically significant stuff, as well, and in Sarasota, we are fortunate to have quite a bit of that stuff still around.”

    That would include boomtime buildings from the 1920s. But he prefers to shoot contemporary buildings with a modern design language.

    “It speaks to me,” he said.

    Surfer Nils Schweitzer, the son and grandson of architects, is captured in a tube wave off the coast of Nicaragua by photographer Ryan Gamma, who made the transition from surf photography to real estate and architecture photography.

    Surfer Nils Schweitzer, the son and grandson of architects, is captured in a tube wave off the coast of Nicaragua by photographer Ryan Gamma, who made the transition from surf photography to real estate and architecture photography.

    Gamma is a Sarasota native who lived several years in Atlanta before returning to Sarasota in 1998. Then he enrolled in college and got his break in surf photography, where an equipment company might pay $5,000 for full rights to a single image.

    A photo session could be three hours. He wore short fins on his feet and held his camera in one hand, using his other arm as “an outrigger” as the wave broke over him. He would be as close as 1 foot from the surfer when he fired the trigger on his pistol-grip waterproof camera housing at the precise moment.

    A clear shot required frequent cleaning of the housing’s lens. This was achieved by spitting on and licking the lens to coat it with saliva, and then dunking it in the sea. Spit, lick, dunk, shoot. Repeat as needed. Edit photos, collect check.

    Back to Sarasota

    He became photo editor of Eastern Surf magazine, but moved back to Sarasota in 2009.

    “I felt burned out on the surfing thing. That is a young man’s game,” Gamma said.

    “I didn’t know what I was going to do. Then I was lucky enough to run into the ladies at Michael Saunders & Co. I had an interest in architecture, and it snowballed. I had no idea it was going to take me where it has taken me.”

    The former Hafner Residence, now owned by the Streacker family, in Sarasota's Laurel Park, as photographed by Ryan Gamma.

    The former Hafner Residence, now owned by the Streacker family, in Sarasota's Laurel Park, as photographed by Ryan Gamma.

    Aside from the Saunders marketing department, Gamma met Saunders agent Drew Russell through mutual friends who were part of the tight-knit Gulf Coast surfing community.

    “I was itching to give it a go,” Gamma said of the real estate photography. “I shot a couple (of listings) for Drew, and then Beth Ward in the marketing department gave me a lot of work,” along with agent Deborah Beacham, who specializes in luxury properties on Casey Key and other barrier islands.

    “I can’t thank them enough,” Gamma said. “If it hadn’t been for them, I wouldn’t be here. They gave me lots of practice shooting real estate.”

    “It is refreshing to come across young talent in someone I find to be enthusiastic about his work, extremely focused on getting just the right shot, never in a rush,” Beacham said.

    Listings are different

    Real estate listings are different from architecture assignments. Most of the listings are not new, and they often are amply furnished with the owners’ possessions. Some listings are more photogenic than others.

    “In real estate, you are photographing stuff that is going to make the house marketable to an audience of people who are going to purchase the home,” Gamma said. “So there are things you might photograph that are not architecturally significant to the building, but are a great tool to market the property.

    “Some things might be dated, or the land itself is the important part” of the listing. “With architecture, it is the design, the shapes,” said Gamma, who said the first architect to hire him was Xavier Garcia of Las Casitas.

    The Robinson Residence, a remodeled home in Lido Shores by architect Guy Peterson, as photographed by Ryan Gamma.

    The Robinson Residence, a remodeled home in Lido Shores by architect Guy Peterson, as photographed by Ryan Gamma.

    And, the buildings are brand new, with no flaws or clutter.

    “These are portfolio projects, and the building is the architect’s baby. This is his proud moment, right now, and for me, they are really exciting. I get a glimpse into a project that hasn’t been brought to light yet.”

    Shooting buildings designed by Guy Peterson, Gamma said, is the fulfillment of a dream.

    “When I first started shooting real estate, I hoped one day to be able to shoot photos for Guy Peterson,” he said.

    “I thought, ‘How thrilling it would be to shoot some of these projects.’ When that finally happened, I was over the moon. And for it to go to this level, to be nominated by his firm, it is hard to put in words how satisfying it feels.

    “It feels like I did something right.”

  • 30 Jul 2016 2:57 PM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Letter From Home: Big night for the Petersons, and Sarasota architecture

    By Harold Bubil , Herald-Tribune

    / Saturday, July 30, 2016

    Guy Peterson’s big night at the American Institute of Architects’ Florida-Caribbean convention last weekend in Palm Beach came equipped with a surprise.

    The 2016 AIA Florida Gold Medal winner knew about it. All he had to do was keep the secret.

    From his wife. Which he did.

    “It’s kind of scary, isn’t it?” said Cindy Peterson, a certified archivist and founder of the Center for Architecture Sarasota (CFAS). “Whoa!”

    Sarasota's Cindy Peterson receives her Honorary AIA membership from Martin Diaz-Yabor, left, the 2016 AIA Florida president and AIA Florida past-president Andrew M. Hayes during the AIA Florida-Caribbean convention July 23 in Palm Beach. Staff photo / Harold Bubil

    You know how well wives like their husbands to keep secrets. But this one was different. She was about to be presented with a rare honor — that of honorary membership in the AIA.

    When AIA Florida’s president, Martin Diaz-Yabor, started the program by listing the accomplishments of an unnamed person, Cindy Peterson started to get the idea.

    “When I heard the words ‘archival work’ and then ‘CFAS,’ I realized, ‘Oh, my gosh, I know that person!’

    Moments later, she was on stage, receiving the award.

    “The award was in recognition of my longtime archival work, promoting the profession,” she said. “I had no idea. We have been going to the AIA conferences for 38 years and I have never seen anyone conferred with this status at any of them, so it was really nice.”

    Honorary AIA membership is unusual. Past winners include Bob Graham, the former Florida governor and U.S. senator, who is known as a champion of good architecture. The Bob Graham Architectural Awareness Award is named for him. Cindy Peterson won that in 2013.

    "We estimate that fewer than a dozen honorary memberships have been awarded in AIA Florida's history, dating back to 1912," said Vicki Long, the chapter’s executive vice president. She is one of those recipients.

    “I am so pleased to have it conferred on me in light of the work of the Center for Architecture and preserving the architectural heritage of Florida,” Cindy Peterson said.

    “I hope to contribute to the AIA ... but I don’t think I have to pay dues. And I don’t have to worry about CEUs,” she said with a laugh. “There are lots of ways to participate and I hope to do that.”

    Best night: Sarasota architects who won AIA Florida design and/or honor awards. Staff photo / Harold Bubil

    Also receiving awards were eight Sarasota architecture firms for design work, and Sarasota’s Ryan Gamma was named Photographer of the Year. Martin Gold, director of UF's CityLab Sarasota, won the McMinn Award as an outstanding architectural educator.

    At the end of the program, Guy Peterson accepted the Gold Medal with a gracious speech.

    All of this got me to thinking that with eight design awards and four honor awards, this was the best night in the history of Sarasota architecture.

    ABBOTT, HOWEY, PETERSON: UPCOMING ARCHITECTURE EVENTS

    Lectures by architects Carl Abbott and John Howey are on the SAF’s August calendar, while Guy Peterson will be the guest of honor at a panel and reception presented by the Herald-Tribune.

    On Thursday, Aug. 4, the Sarasota Architectural Foundation will present a lecture titled “Maya to Modern: The Architecture of Carl Abbott” from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Ringling College’s Academic Center Auditorium, 2699 Old Bradenton Road, Sarasota.

    Howey, author of “The Sarasota School of Architecture: 1941-1966,” will speak from 5:30 to 7:30 Friday, Aug. 5, at the Allyn Gallup Contemporary Art Gallery, 1288 N. Palm Avenue, Sarasota. His topic is “Summer Abstractions” as an exhibit opens on the abstract works of artists John Chamberlain, Syd Solomon, Richard Roblin, Josette Urso, Sonia Smith, David Shapiro, Helen Shulman and John Henry.

    Abbott will discuss his emphasis on designing “with the land.” He recently toured ruins in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize and Angkor Wat, Cambodia, and for years has studied design both ancient and modern. His own designs are guided in ways similar to those of ancient designers, whose architecture was in harmony with the natural environment.

    A reception and book signing of Abbott’s book, “In/Formed by the Land,” will follow the presentation.

    Reservations for both events can be made online at www.saf-srq.org.

    On Tuesday, Aug. 16, architect Guy Peterson, who received the 37th Gold Medal from the Florida-Caribbean chapter of the American Institute of Architects on July 23, will be the guest of honor at a reception and panel discussion presented by the Herald-Tribune from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 16, in our Community Room at 1741 Main St., Sarasota.

    The panel discussion will feature winners of AIA Florida design awards this year, including Carl Abbott, Jerry Sparkman, Greg Hall, Jonathan Parks, Michael Halflants and John Pichette, Sam Holladay, Pam Holladay and Michael Epstein and Peterson.

    The event is open to the public and admission is free. Refreshments will be served. Seating is limited; call 361-4065 for reservations.

     

  • 15 Jul 2016 8:45 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Taking Home the Gold

    Architect Guy Peterson Wins Major Award

    He receives the Gold Medal from the AIA Florida/Caribbean Chapter for his acclaimed body of work.

    1 of 14

    A Casey Key retreat designed by Guy Peterson was the cover of Sarasota Magazine's October 2012 Home & Garden issue.

    AddThis Sharing Buttons

    Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to Google+Share to PinterestShare to EmailShare to Print

    Guy Peterson, FAIA, will receive the 2016 Gold Medal, the highest award bestowed by the American Institute of Architects Florida/Caribbean Chapter, at a ceremony in Palm Beach July 23.

    Already the recipient of more than 80 national, state, and regional design awards, including several awards of high distinction from AIA Florida such as the Presidential Millennium Award of Honor for Design in 2000, Peterson was elected into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2003, and his firm was named the AIA Florida Firm of the Year Award in 2013. 

    Among his many high-profile projects are the restoration and addition of Paul Rudolph and Ralph Twitchell’s 1949 Revere Quality House on north Siesta Key, the Spencer House on South Orange Avenue and the restoration of a midcentury former furniture store into the McCulloch Pavilion, the new home of the Center for Architecture Sarasota. He also is the architect for the luxury condo tower, Aqua, being built on Golden Gate Point, and the finish tower at the rowing facility at Nathan Benderson Park.

    Peterson also is receiving this award in recognition of his extensive pro-bono work for area nonprofits and for helping bringing the University of Florida’s School of Architecture graduate satellite program, UF CityLab Sarasota, to Sarasota along with the development of the Center for Architecture Sarasota. 

    “I am very humbled to receive this honor,” says Peterson. “It is always a privilege to be recognized by one’s peers and the Gold Medal represents that our work has had a positive impact on the profession.”  

    Guy peterson id4ygf

     

  • 15 Jul 2016 8:44 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    ARE 5.0 Launches November 1


     

    Ready to transition to the Architect Registration Examination®(ARE®) 5.0?  

    Mark your calendars for November 1, 2016, the official launch date of the updated exam. The six-division exam will include case studies that simulate real-world practice, incorporate new testing technologies, and feature a format that more closely aligns with modern practice.

     

    Once the exam launches on November 1, you can:

    • Log in to My NCARB and self-transition your eligibilities to ARE 5.0
    • Make an appointment to take an ARE 5.0 division 

     

    In the meantime, here’s how you can prepare for ARE 5.0:

    • Learn more about the new division structure with our in-depth blog series
    • Explore the new question types and case studies that will be featured on the new exam
    • Stay tuned for the late summer release of the ARE 5.0 Guidelines and a new ARE 5.0 Handbook that will help you prepare for each division of ARE 5.0, as well as other helpful exam resources
    • Use our interactive Transition Calculator to figure out which testing strategy best fits your current situation

     

    We’ll continue to administer ARE 4.0 until June 30, 2018. This 20-month period of dual delivery will enable you to finish the exam in a way that best suits your needs.

    Still have questions? Visit ncarb.org/ARE5 to learn more about ARE 5.0.

     

     

    National Council of 
    Architectural Registration Boards

    1801 K Street NW Suite 700K
    Washington, DC, 20006

     

    Twitter

    Facebook

    Instagram

    Google+

    LinkedIn

    YouTube

     


  • 14 Jul 2016 9:40 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Florida Architects Brace For Sea Level Rise

    By Kate Payne Jul 13, 2016

    ShareTwitter Facebook Google+ Email 

    Florida architects are planning for three feet of sea level rise. Here's a look at the new policy.

    Listen

    Listening...

    1:21

    An aerial view of Miami.

    Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/aerialcamera/

    Architects in the Sunshine State are bracing for changing coastlines. The state’s industry group wants their members and clients to accommodate three feet of sea level rise in their design plans. Andrew Hayes is the past president of the American Institute of Architects’ Florida Chapter. He hopes builders will start rethinking urban planning now, especially those in the public sector.

    “The water is coming. Let’s set aside this circular discussion about at what rate, and have the conversation on the front end of some of these large capital investments,” Hayes said.

    Architects, along with civil engineers and landscapers, are already drafting plans to accommodate water, not just block it. Ideas include using native plants as a natural buffer and elevating roads and sidewalks.

    “I think the challenge for us as architects is to figure out how we design buildings to accommodate this, without separating people from the land. Putting everything else on stilts is not a realistic answer or option either and sets off a whole other set of issues,” he said.

    Data from Google Earth shows South Florida is particularly vulnerable to sea level rise. Portions of Miami, Key West and Saint Petersburg all lie below the three foot water mark. But all low-lying areas, even miles from the coast, may be at risk.

  • 08 Jul 2016 9:11 AM | AIA Gulfcoast (Administrator)

    Architecture: Sarasota’s Guy Peterson wins AIA Florida’s Gold Medal.

    By Harold Bubil , Herald-Tribune

    / Friday, July 8, 2016

    Guy Peterson has won AIA Florida/Caribbean's Gold Medal for 2016. Photo by Barbara Banks.

    Guy Peterson has won AIA Florida/Caribbean's Gold Medal for 2016. Photo by Barbara Banks.

    When architect Guy Peterson was just starting his career, his mentor gave him some advice he’s never forgotten.

    “He told me, ‘Guy, in 20 years, I want you to have 20 years of experience and not one year’s experience repeated 20 times,’ Peterson said. “That always resonated with me, that no matter what I do, it is something new, taken to the next level.”

    CLICK HERE FOR PHOTO GALLERY

    Peterson, now 62 and a fellow of the American Institute of Architects, has followed that advice all the way to the pinnacle of success for a Florida architect.

    On July 23 in Palm Beach, he will receive AIA Florida/Caribbean’s highest honor, the Gold Medal. It is presented to an architect who has had “a profound impact on the profession over an extended period of time.”

    “For me, it is a career achievement award,” said Peterson, the Sarasota architect who has designed some of the region’s most important modernist buildings, including many notable houses.

    The AIA honored Peterson on the strengths of his design abilities (he has won more than 80 design awards in his 36-year career) as well as teaching at the University of Florida, pro bono work for nonprofits and for his role both in bringing to Sarasota the UF School of Architecture’s graduate satellite program, UF CityLab Sarasota, and the development of the Center for Architecture Sarasota, a community-based architecture/cultural organization.

    Known as the Ohana Retreat, the Longboat Key mansion at 6630 Gulf of Mexico Dr. was designed by local architect Guy Peterson. (Dec. 18, 2013) (Herald-Tribune staff photo by Dan Wagner)

    Known as the Ohana Retreat, the Longboat Key mansion at 6630 Gulf of Mexico Dr. was designed by local architect Guy Peterson. (Dec. 18, 2013) (Herald-Tribune staff photo by Dan Wagner)

    The only other Sarasota architect to win the AIA Florida Gold Medal was the famed Paul Rudolph in 1989, about 30 years after he left Sarasota to build his career in the Northeast. The award was first presented in 1964. There have been 37 honorees in those 52 years; it is awarded only when the jury believes a candidate is worthy.

    Peterson’s previous AIA Florida honor awards include the Presidential Millennium Award of Honor for Design in 2000, and Firm of the Year in 2013. He was elected into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2003.

    “Guy represents the full scope of a citizen architect,” said University of Florida architecture professor Martin Gold, director of CityLab Sarasota. “He has a great practice and is a talented designer, for sure. He has carved out a niche; there is Guy Peterson’s work, and when you see it, you can recognize it. It has been copied by others, and I think that demonstrates the quality.”

    “I am very flattered by this,” Peterson said. “It is a summation of all the things I have been doing, and hopefully making a difference in any way I can.”

    This 1998 house at 8011 Longbay Blvd. in Ballentine Manor Estates, southern Manatee County, was designed by Guy Peterson. Staff photo / Harold Bubil; 8-19-2013.

    This 1998 house at 8011 Longbay Blvd. in Ballentine Manor Estates, southern Manatee County, was designed by Guy Peterson. It is known as the Theissen House, for its original owner. Staff photo / Harold Bubil; 8-19-2013.

    Although projects like the Sarasota Memorial Hospital Emergency Care Center, the Theissen House, the Revere Quality House Addition and the Spencer House have boosted Peterson’s stature among the top tier of Florida architects, the Gold Medal is not just about design talent, said Fort Myers architect Joyce Owens, president-elect of AIA Florida/Caribbean.

    “You have to show consistent commitment, not just to good design, but to the profession, as well,” Owens said. “And he has shown that commitment through the Center for Architecture, raising the public’s awareness of architecture.”

    The Gold Medal typically “goes to someone who is more engaged in the long-term administration of the AIA and has invested a lot in the AIA,” Martin Gold said. “It is uncommon for someone to get it based on their designs and professional work in an office.

    “His is a broad range of work across a range of scales. Even his projects that never got built are designs or concepts that form another outstanding body of work.”

    The 1960 Scott Building has been renovated by the Center for Architecture Sarasota as the McCulloch Pavilion. At 265 S. Orange Ave. in Sarasota, the building will house CFAS, the University of Florida's CityLab master's degree program and an office for the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Staff photo / Harold Bubil; 3-10-2014.

    The 1960 Scott Building has been renovated by the Center for Architecture Sarasota as the McCulloch Pavilion. Staff photo / Harold Bubil; 3-10-2014.

    The renovation of the Center for Architecture Sarasota’s headquarters is among Peterson’s pro bono projects that enhanced his qualifications for the Gold Medal. Other projects for which he donated design services include the Girl Scouts headquarters on Cattlemen Road, the SPARCC shelter and offices, the Finish Tower at Benderson Park and the Selby Memorial at Selby Gardens.

    “I enjoy giving back where I can to my community,” Peterson said.

    The architect also has taught for nine years as an adjunct professor of architecture at the University of Florida.

    “Teaching has been very good to me in that it keeps me looking forward,” Peterson said, and learning that his way is not the only way to solve architectural challenges.

    Guy Peterson Office for Architecture won a 2014 award of excellence from AIA Florida Gulf Coast for this residence on North Casey Key Road. Herald-Tribune Archive / 2014.

    Guy Peterson Office for Architecture won a 2014 award of excellence from AIA Florida Gulf Coast for this residence on North Casey Key Road. Herald-Tribune Archive / 2014.

    “Teaching has opened my eyes to not just jumping to the first conclusion, but always looking for a different strategy and attitude to how you are going to solve the problem,” he said. “When I am critiquing my students’ work ... I identify the problem that they might have, maybe the scale is not right or the entry is not working.

    “In my mind, I’m thinking, ‘If they just did this, this would be a really powerful project.’ But when I come back, 99 out of 100 times they have solved the problem, and in a way I would never have thought of. It makes me realize there are so many other ways to approach problem-solving.”

    Throughout his career, Peterson has solved problems in a straightforward way, relying on a foundation of rationalist modernism and his appreciation for the art and craft of 20th-century architectural giant Le Corbusier.

    “It is almost poetic what he did with architecture; his use of concrete and form gives you a lot of freedom in how you think about space.”

    The single-story Revere Quality House, at right, built in 1947 at 100 Ogden Lane on Siesta Key, was restored in 2008, when an elevated two-story house, designed by Guy Peterson, was built. The property represents the beginnings of midcentury modern architecture in Sarasota and the current state of the art. Courtesy photo.

    The single-story Revere Quality House, at right, built in 1947 at 100 Ogden Lane on Siesta Key, was restored in 2008, when an elevated two-story house, designed by Guy Peterson, was built. The property represents the beginnings of midcentury modern architecture in Sarasota and the current state of the art. Courtesy photo.

    He does not like his work to be labeled as modernist. Although he uses modern design elements, he prefers to simply create “good architecture” that meets client needs.

    Peterson is not one to twist or disassemble the forms of a building for visual effect. He places a premium on consistency and quality, while at the same time making each building unique.

    “Each project brings new requirements,” he said. “A new site, and the clients bring a new program. I always tell our clients that everything we do has never been built before and will never be built again.

    “As I approach a new project, I want there to be a common thread in the level of quality and maybe an approach to rhythm, proportion and scale, and how I use materials, that people might recognize as part of our work, but also executed in a way that I haven’t done before.”

    That certainly was the case with the Spencer House, on Prospect Street at Orange Avenue in Sarasota, which relased a shower of love-it/hate-it commentary on social media when it was built in 2013.

    “I would rather design a building that people don’t like than one they don’t notice,” Peterson said at the time. But the majority of commenters liked it.

    Peterson said his biggest design accomplishment is “consistency. I have never treated any project like it’s not the best that I can do.”

    Local roots

    Peterson grew up in Sarasota and attended Riverview High School, where he was exposed to Rudolph’s modernism, before studying architecture at the University of Florida. Early in his career, he worked in Tallahassee, eventually forming a partnership with Ivan Johnson before moving back to Sarasota in the late 1980s.

    The home of Gary and Beth Spencer at 1601 Prospect St. in Sarasota. Guy Peterson was the architect, and Dean Thompson the general contractor. Herald-Tribune archive / 2013.

    The home of Gary and Beth Spencer at 1601 Prospect St. in Sarasota. Guy Peterson was the architect, and Dean Thompson the general contractor. Herald-Tribune archive / 2013.

    That move, he said, was one of the most difficult decisions of his career.

    But his most challenging experience came a decade ago when he was approached to design, and co-develop, an enclave of houses for a controversial project known as The Houses of Indian Beach. He is proud of his 23 house designs, but learned that architects should stick to designing and leave developing to others. The project was delayed by protests from neighbors and eventually failed when the real estate market collapsed, leaving only the infrastructure.

    “It was one of the most disappointing projects I’ve ever done,” he said, “because I put so much into it. It was very frustrating. My lesson learned — do what you do best. I am an architect, not a developer. You take your lumps, learn from your mistakes, and don’t make that mistake again.”

    In striving to take his work to “the next level,” Peterson has kept in mind what his Tallahassee mentor, architect Bouchie Barrett, told him about growing with experience.

    “There are levels to my career, where you will hit a project like the Theissen House, the Freund, Revere Quality, the Spencer, that elevate to something new. I don’t repeat those, but I start to evolve new ideas based on new directions that come as you get older.”

    Guy Peterson Office for Architecture, however, is not a one-man shop. He shares his success with his many employees over the years, including architects who now have their own offices, among them Michael Carlson, Michael Halflants and John Pichette, and Joe Kelly, the most recent of the Peterson alumni to start his own firm.

    “There are many people I thank for being a part of this,” he said. “My clients, for giving me this platform to work from; a couple hundred employees, who have all contributed in meaningful ways.”

    His wife, Cindy, whom he married in 1980 a few months before he received his Florida architectural license, “has been through all the wonderful experiences and all that challenges that you face as an architect.”

    She has let him know when she thought he should pass on a proposal, or when his first design iterations were unsatisfactory.

    “She has an amazing design sense. Without her support, and being an honest critic, and my muse ... the medal has my name on it, but I share it with so many people who have helped contribute to my career.”


AIA Florida Gulf Coast Chapter | P.O. Box 160 | Sarasota | FL | 34230 | info@aiagulfcoast.org | 941.315.8242

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software